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Overview of Ind AS 28, Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures

Indian Accounting Standard (Ind AS) 28, Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures

Ind AS 28 sets out the requirements for the application of the equity method when accounting for investments in associates and joint ventures.

The Standard shall be applied by all entities that are investors with joint control of, or significant influence over, an investee.

An associate is an entity over which the investor has significant influence.

Significant influence is the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of the investee but is not control or joint control of those policies.

If an entity holds, directly or indirectly through intermediary (eg subsidiaries), 20 per cent or more of the voting power of the investee, it is presumed that the entity has significant influence, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that this is not the case. Conversely, if the entity holds, directly or indirectly through intermediary (eg subsidiaries), less than 20 per cent of the voting power of the investee, it is presumed that the entity does not have significant influence, unless such influence can be clearly demonstrated. A substantial or majority ownership by another investor does not necessarily preclude an entity from having significant influence.

The existence of significant influence by an entity is usually evidenced in one or more of the following ways:

(a) representation on the board of directors or equivalent governing body of the investee;

(b) participation in policy-making processes, including participation in decisions about dividends or other distributions;

(c) material transactions between the entity and its investee;

(d) interchange of managerial personnel; or

(e) provision of essential technical information.

The existence and effect of potential voting rights that are currently exercisable or convertible, including potential voting rights held by other entities, are considered when assessing whether an entity has significant influence.

The equity method is a method of accounting whereby the investment is initially recognised at cost and adjusted thereafter for the post-acquisition change in the investor’s share of the investee’s net assets. The investor’s profit or loss includes its share of the investee’s profit or loss and the investor’s other comprehensive income includes its share of the investee’s other comprehensive income.

Equity method

The investment in an associate or a joint venture upon acquisition is recognised at cost.

On acquisition of the investment, any difference between the cost of the investment and the entity’s share of the net fair value of the investee’s identifiable assets and liabilities is accounted for as – (a) Goodwill relating to an associate or a joint venture is included in the carrying amount of the investment. Amortisation of that goodwill is not permitted. (b) Any excess of the entity’s share of the net fair value of the investee’s identifiable assets and liabilities over the cost of the investment is recognised directly in equity as capital reserve in the period in which the investment is acquired.

The carrying amount is increased or decreased to recognise the investor’s share of the profit or loss of the investee after the date of acquisition. Appropriate adjustments to the entity’s share of the associate’s or joint venture’s profit or loss after acquisition are made in order to account, for example, for depreciation of the depreciable assets based on their fair values at the acquisition date. Unrealised profits and losses on transactions with associates are eliminated to the extent of the investor’s interest in the investee.

The investor’s share of the investee’s profit or loss is recognised in the investor’s profit or loss.

Distributions received from an investee reduce the carrying amount of the investment.

The investor’s share of proportionate interest in the investee arising from changes in the investee’s other comprehensive income are recognised in the investor’s other comprehensive income.

An entity with joint control of, or significant influence over, an investee shall account for its investment in an associate or a joint venture using the equity method except when that investment qualifies for exemption.

Ind AS 109, Financial Instruments, does not apply to interests in associates and joint ventures that are accounted for using the equity method. When instruments containing potential voting rights in substance currently give access to the returns associated with an ownership interest in an associate or a joint venture, the instruments are not subject to Ind AS 109. In all other cases, instruments containing potential voting rights in an associate or a joint venture are accounted for in accordance with Ind AS 109. An entity also applies Ind AS 109 to other financial instruments in an associate or joint venture to which the equity method is not applied.

When an investment in an associate or a joint venture is held by, or is held indirectly through, an entity that is a venture capital organisation, or a mutual fund, unit trust and similar entities including investment-linked insurance funds, the entity may elect to measure that investment at fair value through profit or loss in accordance with Ind AS 109. An entity shall make this election separately for each associate or joint venture, at initial recognition of the associate or joint venture.

The Standard provides exemptions from applying the equity method similar to those provided in Ind AS 110, Consolidated Financial Statements to the parent that is exempted to prepare consolidated financial statements.

An entity shall apply Ind AS 105 to an investment, or a portion of an investment, in an associate or a joint venture that meets the criteria to be classified as held for sale. The entity’s financial statements shall be prepared using uniform accounting policies for like transactions and events in similar circumstances unless, in case of an associate, it is impracticable to do so. If an associate or a joint venture uses accounting policies other than those of the entity for like transactions and events in similar circumstances, adjustments shall be made to make the associate’s or joint venture’s accounting policies conform to those of the entity when the associate’s or joint venture’s financial statements are used by the entity in applying the equity method. However, if an entity that is not itself an investment entity has an interest in an associate or joint venture that is an investment entity, the entity may, when applying the equity method, retain the fair value measurement applied by that investment entity associate or joint venture to the investment entity associate’s or joint venture’s interests in subsidiaries’. This election is made separately for each investment entity associate or joint venture, at the later of the date on which (a) the investment entity associate or joint venture is initially recognised; (b) the associate or joint venture becomes an investment entity; and (c) the investment entity associate or joint venture first becomes a parent.

After application of the equity method, including recognising the associate’s or joint venture’s losses, the entity applies the requirements of Ind AS 109 to determine whether it is necessary to recognise any additional impairment loss with respect to its net investment in the associate or joint venture.

An entity loses significant influence over an investee when it loses the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of that investee. The loss of significant influence can occur with or without a change in absolute or relative ownership levels. On the loss of significant influence or joint control, the gain or loss is recognised in profit or loss. The entity shall account for all amounts previously recognised in other comprehensive income in relation to that investment on the same basis as would have been required if the investee had directly disposed of the related assets or liabilities.

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